Published Versions 2 Vol 2 (1) : 87–95 2019
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Making FAIR Easy with FAIR Tools: From Creolization to Convergence
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Abstract & Keywords
Abstract: Since their publication in 2016 we have seen a rapid adoption of the FAIR principles in many scientific disciplines where the inherent value of research data and, therefore, the importance of good data management and data stewardship, is recognized. This has led to many communities asking “What is FAIR?” and “How FAIR are we currently?”, questions which were addressed respectively by a publication revisiting the principles and the emergence of FAIR metrics. However, early adopters of the FAIR principles have already run into the next question: “How can we become (more) FAIR?” This question is more difficult to answer, as the principles do not prescribe any specific standard or implementation. Moreover, there does not yet exist a mature ecosystem of tools, platforms and standards to support human and machine agents to manage, produce, publish and consume FAIR data in a user-friendly and efficient (i.e., "easy") way. In this paper we will show, however, that there are already many emerging examples of FAIR tools under development. This paper puts forward the position that we are likely already in a creolization phase where FAIR tools and technologies are merging and combining, before converging in a subsequent phase to solutions that make FAIR feasible in daily practice.
Keywords: FAIR data; FAIR in practice; FAIR tools; FAIR application support; creolization and convergence
Acknowledgements
Part of this work is funded by the NWA program (project VWData - 400.17.605), by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO), by the European Joint Program Rare Diseases (grant agreement #825575) and ELIXIR-EXCELERATE (H2020-INFRADEV-1-2015- 12).
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Article and author information
Cite As
M. Thompson, K. Burger, R. Kaliyaperumal, M. Roos & L.O. Bonino da Silva Santos. Making FAIR easy with FAIR tools: From creolization to convergence. Data Intelligence 2(2020), 87–95. doi: 10.1162/dint_a_00031
Mark Thompson
M. Thompson (m.thompson@lumc.nl) has drafted the first version of this paper; all authors have contributed to the design and implementation of the FAIRifier and FAIR Data Point software and specifications described in the paper.
m.thompson@lumc.nl
Mark Thompson is a senior research scientist in the Biosemantics group at the Human Genetics department of Leiden University Medical Centre. He obtained a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Amsterdam in 2012. He has expertise in hardware and software architecture (co-)design, data management, data modeling, FAIR data infrastructure and computational aspects of knowledge discovery.
0000-0002-7633-1442
Kees Burger
R. Kaliyaperumal (R.Kaliyaperumal@lumc.nl), L.O. Bonino da Silva Santos (luiz.bonino@go-fair.org) and K. Burger (c.a.burger@lumc.nl) have proof-read and contributed improvements to the text; all authors have contributed to the design and implementation of the FAIRifier and FAIR Data Point software and specifications described in the paper.
Kees Burger is a software engineer associated with the Vrije Universiteit and the Biosemantics group at the Leiden University Medical Center. He has been working with pioneers in data sharing and interoperability standards since 2009, developing expertise in software design and architecture, semantic Web technology, and FAIR data infrastructure. His current activities involve the Personal Health Train (PHT) and broader the Internet of FAIR Data and Services (IFDS).
0000-0002-5437-779X
Rajaram Kaliyaperumal
R. Kaliyaperumal (R.Kaliyaperumal@lumc.nl), L.O. Bonino da Silva Santos (luiz.bonino@go-fair.org) and K. Burger (c.a.burger@lumc.nl) have proof-read and contributed improvements to the text; all authors have contributed to the design and implementation of the FAIRifier and FAIR Data Point software and specifications described in the paper.
Rajaram Kaliyaperumal was born in Pondicherry, India. He received a B.Tech degree in Biomedical Engineering from Pondicherry University, India in 2008 and an M.Sc degree in Biomedical Engineering from Linköping University, Sweden in 2011. In 2012 he joined the department of Computer and Information Science, Linköping University as a software engineer. During this time he developed methods and tools to align and repair ontologies. In 2013 he joined the Biosemantics group, Leiden, in the Netherlands as a software developer. His current research activities include investigating the use of semantic Web technology in the context of FAIR data and developing prototypes to demonstrate the use of FAIR data.
0000-0002-1215-167X
Marco Roos
All authors have contributed to the design and implementation of the FAIRifier and FAIR Data Point software and specifications described in the paper.
Marco Roos is assistant professor and group leader of the Biosemantics group of the Leiden University Medical Centre (Human Genetics Department). The group is known for co-founding and advocating the FAIR data principles. His research focus is on making state-of-the-art computer science applicable to enhance biomedical research (e-Science), particularly the application of computational knowledge discovery and linked data techniques to address translational research challenges of rare human diseases. At an international level, Marco is focused on the implementation of FAIR principles to create a powerful substrate and worldwide robust infrastructure for knowledge discovery across distributed rare disease data resources.
0000-0002-8691-772X
Luiz Olavo Bonino da Silva Santos
R. Kaliyaperumal (R.Kaliyaperumal@lumc.nl), L.O. Bonino da Silva Santos (luiz.bonino@go-fair.org) and K. Burger (c.a.burger@lumc.nl) have proof-read and contributed improvements to the text; all authors have contributed to the design and implementation of the FAIRifier and FAIR Data Point software and specifications described in the paper.
Luiz Olavo Bonino da Silva Santos is the International Technology Coordinator of the GO FAIR International Support and Coordination Office, and Associate Professor of the BioSemantics group at the Leiden University Medical Centre in Leiden, The Netherlands. His background is in ontology-driven conceptual modelling, semantic interoperability, service-oriented computing, requirements engineering and context-aware computing. In the last five years Luiz has been involved in a number of activities to realize the FAIR principles, including the development of a number of technologies and tools to support making, publishing, indexing, searching and annotating FAIR (meta)data.
0000-0002-1164-1351
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